6 Supplements For Optimal Joint Health

6 Supplements For Optimal Joint Health

Lots of people struggle with joint pain, especially as they get older. It can range from a temporary twinge following exercise or exertion through to daily difficulties across your body. Joint care is really important to maintain mobility and good health.

There can be lots of different reasons for joint pain, so it’s always best to get this checked out by a health professional, especially if it’s more frequent or severe. Knee pain is the most common place to experience joint pain, as this takes the full weight of your body every day. Back, arm, wrist and neck pain are prevalent too.

Exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough sleep, massage and following a balanced, nourishing diet are all important factors when it comes to joint care. Stretching before exercise, low impact exercise and maintaining good posture also contribute to healthy joints, as well as supplements to help maintain healthy muscle and tissue.

Supplements for Joint Care

Taking a dietary supplement for your joints can help you to achieve a balanced diet with the right mix of vitamins, minerals and nutrients for optimal health. Some of the supplements that you can try if you want to improve your joint care include:

Turmeric

Turmeric is used by many people to treat and prevent pain throughout the body. It contains curcumin which is thought to be an anti-inflammatory and studies have shown that it improves joint pain in a way that may compare to ibuprofen.

Glucosamine

Found naturally in the body, glucosamine is found in your cartilage. Cartilage is the connective tissue between our bones and joints - without it, they can rub together which can cause inflammation and joint pain. It’s thought that glucosamine sulfate may prevent the breakdown of cartilage in the body.

Omega-3

Commonly found in fish oil, omega-3 reduces inflammation and benefits the body’s natural immune system. It’s thought to be particularly beneficial for helping with osteoarthritis, which can be a big contributor to joint pain. If you’re following a plant-based diet but want to  benefit from omega-3 then there are vegan omega-3 supplements available.

Calcium

Calcium is important for building bones and benefiting your overall health. Your body uses calcium for everything from pumping your heart and contracting your muscles. Getting enough calcium in your diet means that your blood and bones function correctly and your joints can work effectively.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to arthritis and the development of joint pain with age. It’s also essential for supporting healthy bones and muscles, immune health and the formation of your teeth. It’s known as the sunshine vitamin as we naturally absorb some vitamin D from sunlight.

Vitamin C

Some causes of joint pain, like osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, may benefit from vitamin C. It’s thought to fight joint inflammation and helps the body to make collagen, the main protein in joint tissue and bone, so strengthening this is key for joint care.

Maintaining Healthy Joints

Prevention is the best option when it comes to joint care and reducing the risk of developing joint pain or mobility issues. By making small changes before you experience any pain or symptoms you can enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle for much longer. Healthier joints also mean that you’re more likely to maintain an exercise routine, which is another health essential.

Discover our selection of Joint Pain supplements, aimed at keeping your joints in optimum health.

 

References

Daily, J.W., Yang, M. and Park, S. (2016). Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials. Journal of Medicinal Food, [online] 19(8), pp.717–729. 

Herrero-Beaumont, G., Ivorra, J.A.R., del Carmen Trabado, M., Blanco, F.J., Benito, P., Martín-Mola, E., Paulino, J., Marenco, J.L., Porto, A., Laffon, A., Araújo, D., Figueroa, M. and Branco, J. (2007). Glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using acetaminophen as a side comparator. Arthritis & Rheumatism, [online] 56(2), pp.555–567. 

Lau, C.S., Morley, K.D. and Belch, J.J.F. (1993). EFFECTS OF FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTATION ON NON-STEROIDAL ANTI—INFLAMMATORY DRUG REQUIREMENT IN PATIENTS WITH MILD RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS—A DOUBLE-BLIND PLACEBO CONTROLLED STUDY. Rheumatology, [online] 32(11), pp.982–989. 

Allaire, J., Couture, P., Leclerc, M., Charest, A., Marin, J., Lépine, M.-C., … Lamarche, B. (2016). A randomized, crossover, head-to-head comparison of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid supplementation to reduce inflammation markers in men and women: the Comparing EPA to DHA (ComparED) Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(2), 280–287. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.131896

Szent-Györgyi, A.G. (1975). Calcium regulation of muscle contraction. Biophysical Journal, [online] 15(7), pp.707–723. 

Ripani, U., Manzarbeitia-Arroba, P., Guijarro-Leo, S., Urrutia-Graña, J. and De Masi-De Luca, A. (2019). Vitamin C May Help to Reduce the Knee’s Arthritic Symptoms. Outcomes Assessment of Nutriceutical Therapy. Medical Archives, [online] 73(3), pp.173–177.

Laslett, L.L., Quinn, S., Burgess, J.R., Parameswaran, V., Winzenberg, T.M., Jones, G. and Ding, C. (2014). Moderate vitamin D deficiency is associated with changes in knee and hip pain in older adults: a 5-year longitudinal study. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, [online] 73(4), pp.697–703.